• You are here:
  • Home »
  • Nine events of instruction

Tag Archives for " Nine events of instruction "

Three steps to take WHILE presenting instruction

blackboard with drawn checked boxes. Text next to boxes reads: Present the instruction/ Provide guided practice/ promote independent performance

You've warmed up your audience.

You've gotten their attention.

You've told them what they're about to learn, and you've reminded them of their prior related knowledge.  

It's time to start actually teaching....this is the exciting part!

"Actually teaching" is a three-step process, if you want your course participants to actually REMEMBER and be able to use what you teach.

Robert M. Gagné's "nine events of instruction" include not just presenting the instruction, but also providing learners with guided practice in APPLYING what they've just learned, with your direct guidance and help.  And once they can do what you're teaching them to do with your help, the next step is to structure in some way for them to do it on their own.

This three step process takes your learners past the point of passively absorbing YOUR expertise, and helps them begin to internalize and develop their own competencies and skill sets, based on what you have shared with them. 

Create a course that teaches beautifully

Make your online course highly effective and engaging!

We'll show you how.

The next cohort of the Course Design Formula® Master Course launches in June.

Any time you plan to present instruction, it's critical to consider how you will include guided practice, and how you will help your learners implement what you're teaching on their own.

This is what makes the difference between effective teaching and simply exposing people to information.

Over the next three weeks, I'll write blog posts that go into each of these steps in depth:

PRESENT

INSTRUCTION

Present the instruction the way that works best for the specific TYPE of learning the lesson contains. 

What are the different possible types of learning, and how do you know which one your lesson contains? I'll explain  in next week's blog post, so stay tuned!

GUIDED

PRACTICE

Provide ways for your learners to implement the instruction themselves, with your guidance, support, and help.

 This is one of the MOST important things you can do to ensure your instruction really gets learned.

INDEPENDENT

PERFORMANCE

It's not enough to just tell learners to do something...we must build structures into our courses that help them do the right thing, on their own, in the right way...

.. and to demonstrate that they know it, through their own actions.


As you think about content that you want to include in your online course, it's helpful to start brainstorming about how you can help your course participants play an active role in learning the materials... at first with your direct guidance and help, and then on their own. 

If you'd like to learn more about how to do this, check out my book, Course Design Formula: How to Teach Anything to Anyone Online.

If you'd like to talk about it, send me an email to Rebecca@learnandgetsmarter.com, or join us on Facebook!

Three things to do BEFORE you present instruction

Human Brain Lobes on Blackboard.

Educational theorist and researcher Robert M. Gagné observed skilled teachers in action, and noticed that they followed nine specific steps in order to create effective learning.

He codified these steps and called them "The Nine Events of Instruction".

Let's take a closer look at the three things Gagné  noticed highly effective teachers do, BEFORE they present the new material they want their students to learn.

The first step is: Gain the learner's attention.  (See how I gained YOUR attention by using a different font color and larger text?)

How can you gain your learner's attention before presenting new instruction in your online course? 

Here's a humorous example: an attention-grabbing cat video I  designed as an ice-breaker for a (hypothetical) online piano course for reluctant first-time musicians:

I hope you got a kick out of that video,

and that it got  (and held) your attention!

Here's why it works:

  • It's funny
  • It's short
  • It's unexpected
  • It tunes in to the learner's anxiety and concerns (about being able to learn to play the piano)
  • It's supportive and encouraging
  • It leads directly into the (imaginary) piano lesson to follow
  • Everybody loves cat videos


Notice that this opening video does not actually start teaching how to play the piano. 


Gaining the learner's attention is an introductory step to take BEFORE you present the actual instruction.

What's next? 

The next step is to let your learners know what they will be learning in the instruction that is going to follow.

(You're still not presenting the instruction. 

 You're just TELLING THEM what they are going to learn).

In our imaginary music course, the instructor might say something like "In this lesson, you will learn how to play a simple chord on the piano."

And there's still one MORE thing you need to do before you actually start teaching the material. (Keep reading to find out what it is....)

Grab your learners' attention

with stunning digital workbooks.

It's FAST, EASY, and FREE!


The third step to take before actually presenting the instruction, is to help learners recall anything they already know, that is relevant to what you are about to teach them.  

For example, in our imaginary piano course, the instructor might say, "Remember that yesterday we learned the names of the notes on the piano. In today's lesson, you will learn how to put those notes together to make a pleasing sound called a 'chord'."

Course Design Formula™ Book



If you'd like to learn more about the three steps to take BEFORE you present any new instruction, check out pages 161 to 183 of my book, Course Design Formula: How to Teach Anything to Anyone Online.

I have a mission  for you (should you choose to accept it.... )

Think about a specific lesson that you'd like to teach online, and ask yourself these questions:

Before you begin actually teaching the lesson:

  1. 1
    How will you gain YOUR learners' attention?
  2. 2
    How will you inform them about what you're going to teach?
  3. 3
    How will you help them remember relevant things they already know, that will help them learn what you're about to teach?

I'd love to hear your ideas.

Write to me at Rebecca@learnandgetsmarter.com and let's talk about it!

The 9 Events of Instruction

9 different colored sticky notes on a blackboard

What has to happen in order to actually teach someone something?

If simply exposing people to information is not the same as actually teaching them, how DO we actually teach, especially online?

Educational theorist and researcher Robert M. Gagné studied good teachers in action, and discovered what they were doing that made their teaching effective.

His research revealed that highly effective teachers were following nine specific steps, which he called "The Nine Events of Instruction".

It's hard to remember nine things at a time (the limits of our short term memory make five to seven things the maximum length for easy mental processing).  

So let's break the nine events of instruction down into three groups, each of which only has three things in it that you need to remember at any one time.  (See what I did there? 🤔 💭 💡⁉️)


              

        


In order to teach effectively

in any context

(but especially online):

  • There are 3 things you have to do BEFORE you present the instruction
  • There are 3 things you have to do WHILE you present the instruction
  • There are 3 things you have to do AFTER you present the instruction
One small piece being cut out of a larger pumpkin pie

So that means:

Presenting the instruction  is only ONE of NINE steps needed to teach effectively...

..and if all you are doing is PRESENTING information, you are only doing  A FRACTION of what it takes to effectively TEACH that information.

Here's your main takeaway for today (unfortunately, it's not an actual piece of  pumpkin pie):

In order to teach effectively online (or anywhere, but especially online), there are NINE THINGS you have to do, in the right order.

Presenting the information is only ONE of those nine things.

Next we will talk about the three things you have to do BEFORE you present the instruction, so stay tuned!

hilarious cat dressed in a tie and shirt collar, holding a laptop and decaf as he presents information