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My “Tinkerbell” moment… and yours

Rainbow reflected human hands

As creative experts and solopreneurs, facing challenges is part of what we do. If we didn't love facing challenges, and do so willingly... and if we weren't at least somewhat good at coming up with solutions to those challenges.. we wouldn't be entrepreneurs.

That said, there's a limit to the coping skills, time, energy, and resources that any individual or business has... and when that limit is reached, a deeper level of resourcefulness is needed than ever before. 

My premise in this blog post is that we have reached that moment now. I'm calling it a "Tinkerbell" moment... when your own level of belief in the importance of what you're here to do, and your clients' and customers' commitment to supporting your business endeavor, are critical to the well-being and survival of your enterprise.

Rainbow reflected human hands
Flower growing through crack in the asphalt
Background Abstract Misty Mountain Range Colourful Wallpaper Digital Art Gradiant Pastel Dramatic Backdrop

Business experts and CEO's of large corporations, 

reflecting on the first quarter of 2022 and its implications for the year ahead, seem to agree on one thing:

 there is continuing volatility and unpredictability in store for all of us.

We in the online course space are in a very fortunate position, compared to many industries.

Let's count our blessings:

  • The pandemic has been GOOD for the online course industry 
  • We are able to do our work in safety and from home
  • Conditions of uncertainty require that people learn new things.. and that's where we can help

That said, I'm seeing signs of financial and emotional stress out there (and in here, too) that are starting to take a toll, even on us.

The conditions of prolonged, unrelenting, and continually worsening stress that have been impacting the world for the past several years have energized and inspired us to grow, to get creative, to found our businesses.

 But these same conditions, especially as they continue to get worse, and worse... and worse...may also be wearing you, me, and our clients and customers, out.

Since about last November, it's been harder for people to make and follow through on financial commitments... and this becomes a vicious circle.

If your OWN suppliers are charging you more, due to supply chain issues. .. and your OWN customers are able to pay you less, or less reliably, or in smaller numbers, due to the stresses THEY face... and if inflation starts making all this worse... a downward spiral can start to set in.

Can you relate? Have you faced this? How can we best cope?


Person falling through a hole

The MOST important thing we can do at a time like this, is to take good care of ourselves first. 

This  really IS a "put your own oxygen mask on first" moment.


To help you do that, I've created a "Mindset Reset" workbook for course creators. 

It's a fillable PDF and you can

 download it here

(or click on the arrow to access it).

Be sure to download it  from the web,

save it to your own computer,

and after you fill it in, hit "print to PDF" to save your inputs.

download arrow

How are you taking care of yourself, your business, and your customers in these challenging times? 

What lessons are you learning about what works for you, and what doesn't,

as a result of facing prolonged and ongoing stress under unpredictable and volatile conditions?

Heart hands as a group of diverse people hands connected together shaped as a love symbol expressing the feeling of being happy and togetherness.

Once we take care of ourselves, we are here to take care of each other.

 The premise of business in general, and an online course business in particular, is that we are creating products, programs, and services that provide solutions to other peoples' pain.

There's a lot of pain out there in the world these days... which means there are a lot of ways we, as online course creators, can be of service.

What pain points do YOUR products and services solve?


How are those pain points being impacted by current events?

What are the implications for the courses you're creating, and the way you're offering them to the people you serve?


Here's an interesting question:

What does learning design have to do with all this?

The surprising answer is: A LOT!


Understanding the PURPOSE of your business = KNOWING YOUR WHY.

WHY are you working so hard to create online courses and learning programs that improve peoples' lives?
WHY are you here, in this online business space?
WHY do you do what you do?

How will peoples' lives be DIFFERENT AND BETTER 

as a direct result of using your products and participating in your services?

If you have read my book,

taken my Streamlined Course Creation course

or participated in the Course Design Formula® Master Course,

 you will recognize that what we are talking about is:

the OVERALL LEARNING GOAL 

for your business as a whole.  

Your business' learning goal determines the overall shape or structure you create for the way you offer your products and services.

The romantic tunnel of pink flower trees


My business, as a whole, is here to promote MINDSET CHANGE.

I want to change the way people approach creating online courses,

so that they always put GOOD LEARNING DESIGN FIRST.

How about yours?


 What's the driving purpose, mission, vision of YOUR business? 

What's your WHY for doing what you do?

What makes fulfilling that "why" even more important now than ever, in these very challenging times?

Let's talk about it!

Join us on Facebook

 in the

Course Design Formula® Community.

Send me an email

 to

Rebecca@learnandgetsmarter.com

Come to the 

Learn and Get Smarter community meeting

Saturdays on Zoom.

Come to the Learn and Get Smarter Community Meeting

Where we talk about how to survive and thrive

 with online courses and online business

in these challenging times

Group of Multiethnic Diverse World People

The MAGIC of coaching: what makes it work?

Young woman flexing muscles in front of large superhero shadow on pink background


In previous blog posts, I’ve shared how I structure the coaching aspect of my business, and what happens during a coaching session.

Now let’s explore the most interesting thing about coaching, which is:

 WHAT ACTUALLY MAKES IT WORK?


What I mean by “coaching”:

Working with clients individually to provide “done-with-you” course design and course creation services.


What I mean by “makes it work”:

The client ends up with a course design that fulfills their vision, goals, and expectations for what they were hoping to produce.

It's the  immediacy and specificity of the coaching situation

 that make it so highly effective.

Coaching is completely customized to the client’s unique course design situation: 

their specific target audience, subject matter, and goals.


The importance of CONTEXT

Clients often have course-design questions such as:

  • “Is this ENOUGH guided practice?” 
  • “What’s the BEST app to use?”
  •  “HOW should I provide independent performance?”

The answers can only come from understanding the whole CONTEXT:

  • Enough guided practice for teaching WHAT, to WHOM, under what CONDITIONS?
  • The best app to use for WHICH content, in WHICH situation?
  • Independent performance for WHOM, based on their having already learned WHAT?

The structure of a coaching session optimizes the ability to answer these types of questions.

Designing an effective and engaging online course requires BOTH subject matter expertise AND course design expertise, and coaching provides a customized context for making that happen. 

The client operates their subject matter expertise and I operate my course design expertise. 

Two people moving a heavy couch together


We are like two people moving a large heavy item of furniture (the course content) 

to place it in the ideal setting (the course structure).

It's difficult or impossible to move a couch up three flights of stairs and around a corner all by yourself,

but if you have someone helping you by holding up the other end, the job gets much easier.

That said, there are times when coaching is NOT the best solution to a client's course design situation or needs.

 If  you don't have an immediate, specific need to create a specific course, or don't yet have a defined course topic or  target audience, it may make more sense to take the Course Design Formula® Master Course rather than coaching.

The Master Course provides space, time, and a community of peers, allowing each participant to develop their online teaching skills while also clarifying the specific transformation they want to deliver, and for whom.

Let's say coaching IS the right answer: What makes it work?

Coaching is completely customized to the client’s unique course design situation:

their specific target audience, subject matter, and goals.

We start by creating  a high level vision for what the client wants their course (or their whole online academy) to achieve.

That gives  us a “North Star” to guide by, so that everything we design or create aligns correctly with the client’s highest vision and goals.

We then work our way down through a customized process I’ve created, to get clear on the specific transformation the client wants their course to provide.

Once we know that, we determine the specific domain of learning that will deliver that transformation most effectively.

We then use the Course Design Formula® to structure the course based on best practices for delivering instruction in that learning domain. 

Getting the domain of learning right

is essential for creating an effective and engaging course.


When you have the domain of learning right,

 the effect is smooth and easy -- like a knife through butter. 


When you have the domain of learning wrong, 

 the effect is unpleasant and grating, like nails on a chalkboard.

(Yes, having the wrong domain of learning really is that unpleasant, it actually hurts).

Young braided hair african american girl over isolated background covering ears with fingers with annoyed expression for the noise of loud  screeching

Coaching allows us to quickly adjust the course design to fit the client's deepest vision for it.

We can listen for any discordant notes,  quickly discover anything that doesn't fit the client's vision for what they want to create, and adjust it right away.


Coaching is highly effective and impactful. It gets optimum results for clients, fast. That’s because coaching:

  • Has high SOCIAL PRESENCE
  • Provides direct live GUIDED PRACTICE
  • Allows for supervised INDEPENDENT PERFORMANCE
  • Offers immediate FEEDBACK
  • Supports effective ASSESSMENT by both client and coach
  • Encourages monitored ITERATION for continual improvement

The Coaching Conundrum

When the goal is to CREATE SOMETHING NEW (the highest level of Bloom’s taxonomy) it is very helpful to have one to one direct support in alignment with the 2 sigma problem discovered by Bloom (yes, the same Bloom.. this is another aspect of his research).

The coaching conundrum though is that as Bloom points out in his 2 sigma article, coaching is expensive for the client and resource intensive for the coach. 

Coaching takes a lot of INPUT of time and energy from the coach. The reason it works so well for the client is that it’s completely focused on the client’s unique situation and goals. That by definition makes it not at all scalable. The scale it works at is the scale of one to one.

Businessmen walking on top of complex maze

So coaching solves one problem 

(how to provide a customized solution tailored to each client’s specific needs)

 that reveals another problem: how to design a scalable business.

"AHA!" you may say... and in fact, many people DO say... "this is where online courses come in! 

You create online courses to scale your coaching practice."

There are ways in which this can in fact, work.

BUT...even in online courses, there is often a need for one-on-one direct live support

to help learners APPLY the teaching in the course to their own specific situation. 

Coaching is highly effective.

Courses are highly scalable.

To be both highly scalable AND highly effective, courses often need to include at least some direct one-to-one coaching

BUT... coaching is not scalable, which then puts a constraint on how scalable an online course can be and still remain optimally effective.

Have you grappled with these issues in your online course business?

We are going to take a deep dive into exploring this "wicked problem" at the Learn and Get Smarter community meeting on Saturday, October 23rd, 2021. 

I hope you can join us as we brainstorm and synergize how to provide an optimized learning experience for as many people as possible!

If you'd like to share your thoughts with me before then, drop me a note to Rebecca@learnandgetsmarter.com.

I can't wait to hear YOUR experiences, insights, and reflections on coaching, courses, and how they can work together in your business to help people learn and get smarter!

Reduce cognitive load to make your course more scalable

Man and woman carrying large orange bar graph

As our forced global experiment in online learning is showing, it’s more challenging to create online learning, and more challenging to learn from it, than is the case with classroom-based learning.

But...why?

The reason is that the online learning interface adds cognitive load to the learning experience.

But again… WHY???

Two factors that add cognitive load to online learning are lack of immediate feedback and reduced social presence.

When the instructor is not in the same physical location as the learner, in real time, it’s harder for the instructor to know when learners are getting lost or confused, and it’s harder for learners to get the help they need.

Crossroad signpost saying this way, that way, the other way concept for lost, confusion or decisions


Another factor that is specific to online learning is the extraneous cognitive load added by the need to NAVIGATE the online interface.

It’s not always clear and obvious to learners where to start, where to click, or what to do next.

And taking the time to make it clear and obvious cuts into learning time and is not the most fun and engaging aspect of online learning and teaching, even though it may be necessary.

In general, it’s important to spell everything, including navigation, out  very clearly and specifically when setting up your online course.

Sometimes the only way to know you have NOT done that enough, is to listen to the tech support calls you get once you launch.

It’s not the most fun part of a launch, but hearing directly from your course participants about where they are getting stuck, lost, confused, or facing challenges, is an important part of the E in the “ADDIE” model of online course design.

 (ADDIE stands for Analyze, Design, Develop, Implement, and Evaluate).

If you EXPECT to receive this type of feedback and take it in a spirit of discovery about how to continue improving your course, you will compensate for some of the lack of feedback otherwise inherent in online teaching.

So... let’s say you get feedback that students are struggling with course navigation.  A helpful approach is to create upfront guidance on how to navigate every aspect of the course, and make sure to respond to tech support calls as soon as they come in.

Creating a culture of openness to feedback, willingness to make necessary changes, and caring support, is an important aspect of effective teaching...whether online or off.

The thing is, though, that that way of teaching is not scalable.

 It’s doable for 30 students, or maybe even 50, in a cohort. 

It’s NOT manageable (at least, not by a solo edupreneur) for 500 or 1000 students at a time.

Group of experts meeting online

So simplifying course navigation and reducing cognitive load as much as possible 

are critical to making an online course more scalable.

But there’s a catch, because often the things that make a course more engaging, -- such as varying the types of content and including interactive activities -- add to navigational complexity.

A course that’s a series of talking head videos one after the other is very easy to navigate. But it’s also not engaging from a learning point of view. Students can easily go from one video to the next. But there’s not much for them to DO while watching long videos.

But including engaging activities that require a switch from video to PDF downloads to interactive games, adds complexity to the navigation along with adding engagement to the course.

Bulldog trying to get through a cat door


So in other words:

 as a course creator, it’s easy to get stuck between a rock and a hard place.

Sigh.

These dilemmas have business implications, because if you have to be personally available in order to ensure a good learning experience for every learner, then the number of learners you can serve at any one time is limited by your own time, energy, and capacity to address whatever comes up.

As I see it, there are four qualities that an online course business should aim for,  in order to  fulfill the promise of online learning (a promise that many are feeling has NOT been fulfilled, right about now).

Ideally, we want our products and services to be:

  • Service-oriented: helping people make their lives better in some way
  • Serviceable: effectively delivering the promised transformation
  • Sustainable: able to be provided in an ongoing way that does not exhaust time, energy, and resources
  • Scalable: able to be offered to large numbers of people

These factors are CONSTRAINTS…limits or guidelines we must address in order to make an online course business work for both our learners and ourselves.

And the challenge is making all those components work together and stay in balance, all at the same time.


Learn how to create YOUR highly impactful online course!

Check out our free, on-demand webinar!

Streamlined Course Creation
Hosted by  Rebecca Cuevas
About this webinar In this webinar, I’m going to formally introduce myself and tell you the story of how I got here. We’ll dive into what it takes to set up a highly effective and engaging online course, and I’ll share with you a system that can help you get YOUR course set up faster than you ever thought possible. What you’ll learn How to structure your course to promote learning How to plan effective lessons How to make your course stand out from the crowd Stay to the end to receive a special offer I make only to attendees of this webinar!

Reducing navigational complexity (while maintaining as much engagement and variety within the course as possible) will make a course more scalable.

The challenge is how to do that without also removing engagement and interactivity.

What is the sweet spot where each of the factors is optimized?

My sense is that it’s not necessary to optimize all four factors in the SAME version of a course, as long as we are able to optimize all four factors in our BUSINESS as a whole.

You can offer a high-level mastermind (that is not scalable, but provides tremendous value) to a very small number of select, highly motivated learners.

That course can have a lot of interactivity even at the cost of adding complexity to the navigation,  because you will be available to help shepherd people through.

You can also have a different course, with simpler navigation and little or no personal interaction with you, that is infinitely scalable. 

Chocolate cake with bonbon


 It may not be possible to have our cake (in the form of a highly customized and personal learning experience for our learners) and eat it too (in the form of a highly scalable hands-off online course), all in one course.

 A possible solution is to have multiple courses that serve different purposes for different segments of your target audience.

Two Chocolate Cupcake On A Wooden Board


What are your thoughts? 

Have you grappled with these, or similar, issues in designing your own courses?

Let’s talk about it in the Facebook group,

 or join us at the Learn and Get Smarter community meeting to share your thoughts in person.


 Save your spot 

in the January cohort of the Course Design Formula® Master Course

Take the stress and overwhelm out of setting up YOUR online course

Come to the community meeting

Saturday, December 12th,2020

9 AM Pacific/ 12 Noon Eastern

many people online in a conference call

Ensuring Learner Success

Happy people jumping for joy

How can you ensure learner success in your online course?

Just as in a physical classroom, there is no 100% guaranteed way to be SURE that EVERYONE who signs up for an online course, will complete everything in it and get optimal results.  

Some of that depends on the learner: their motivation, persistence, level of engagement, prior knowledge, and many other factors.

But let's look at the elements that we CAN control as we design and build our courses, and do our very best to optimize those.

  • Learning Design

  • Lesson Clarity

  • Engagement

Learning Design

Have a clear learning goal for the course as a whole.

Structure the course based on how people learn the EXACT type of material needed to reach that goal.

Make sure that everything in the course  contributes to achieving the course learning goal.

How can you make  your course work for EACH learner, when each learner is so unique?

The most important contributor to learner success, beyond your course design, is the learners themselves.
A question I've been pondering lately is: how can we, as online course designers, create a CUSTOMIZED learning experience for each learner, when people vary so much in their personalities, motivations, prior knowledge, and ways of approaching a task?


It's relatively easy to  create a customized experience and ensure that each of your learners is engaged, learning, happy, and getting what they need out of the course, when your course is small.

The key there is to build FEEDBACK MECHANISMS into the course at every step of the way, so that your course participants know they can always reach you and that you will hear and respond to their challenges, issues, and concerns.

But many people create online courses with the goal of having an evergreen, "set it and forget it" way to "teach while you sleep".  That goal is the gold standard of online course design... but is it effective in terms of getting learners real results?

The ONLINE LEARNING situation makes it relatively easy to use digital media to create an evergreen "set it and forget it" course that puts money in your bank account while you sleep.  

However, the requirements of HUMAN LEARNING often demand real-time (or at least, semi-synchronous)  interaction and monitoring from an actual human (ie, YOU).  Ensuring that  learning gets  into each of your learners' minds in the way that works best for them requires ongoing,  dynamic participation from an instructor who is awake.

How does one reconcile these two things?

If you put your course online and then "set it and forget it", how can you be sure that each of your course participants is getting real results? 


Triumphant business people standing in front of rays of light

The best way is to ASK them, of course.  You can build feedback and assessment mechanisms into your course using quizzes, surveys, polls, live group coaching sessions, office hours, forms, and many other methods.

Creating a culture of feedback, and being open to hearing it, is critical.

It is also important to respond to user feedback so that your course participants feel they are not just putting information out there, but also getting  meaningful responses back from you.

Silhouettes of people with colorful speech bubbles

It's important to talk to your future course participants before, during, and after the time you spend working with them in your online course.

  • Talk to them before creating a course to be sure you are creating a course they want and need. 
  • Talk to them while creating your course in order to beta test and pilot and get feedback on whether your course design addresses their needs.
  •  Especially talk to them while TEACHING your course, and then 
  • Talk to them afterwards to find out how the course went for them and how they are using what they learned, now that the course is over.

As I mentioned above, it's relatively easy, or at least, possible,  to talk to your students, receive and respond to feedback,  and help each learner get the most out of your course, when your course is relatively small.

My Course Design Formula® Master Course, for example, is like a boutique bistro restaurant that serves custom-catered "meals"  (by which I mean, delectable learning experiences) to a small group of highly select students.

 I can provide a tailored, individualized experience for a small group of students at a time. I can't (at least, not yet) provide that level of customization for an unlimited number students at a time. That's one of the goals I'm working towards, but in the meantime, I just want to enroll a small group of highly dedicated students for the next cohort, which starts January 12th, 2021. 

Class size will be limited, so if one of your goals is to create a powerful, transformative online course that does justice to your unique  expertise, it's not too early to start thinking NOW about whether you'd like one of the few spots in that very select group.

There's a lot of pressure on online course creators to grow and scale their courses. Growing and scaling a course is relatively easy if the course mainly provides information in a digital format. But if your course teaches complex processes that learners must APPLY to their own  unique situations  in practical, performance-based ways, then a higher degree of direct interaction and guidance from you as the instructor will be needed in order to ensure your learners get results.

One of the challenges that I see happening in many "set it and forget it" style online courses is that learner success (and therefore, learner attention) drop off around module 3 or 4. That's where the need to actually APPLY what's been presented in the course so far, begins to come in. How many online courses have you bought where you see THIS pattern happen:

  • Welcome! Everyone is excited about the course!
  •  The basic information is presented. Everyone gets it. All is well.
  • Things start getting hard, it's time to actually DO things the instructor tells you to do
  • You stop paying attention to the course
  • You never look at the course again
  • You feel guilty for having spent money on something that didn't get you the results promised
  • You start to wonder if you're actually good at learning things
  • You start to wonder if online courses really work

I've been thinking a lot about the above scenario, which I've seen happen far too many times in too many online courses. If that's happened to you (it has to me, and to pretty much everyone I know), here are some things to consider:

  • It's not your fault. You sincerely wanted to learn the material.
  • It's not the instructor's fault. Their course may actually be well designed.
  • It's the fault of a mismatch between the AFFORDANCES of the online learning space, and the CONSTRAINTS of human learning.

What do I mean by that?

I mean that the online learning space makes it fast, easy, and tempting to create learning materials that can be sold to an unlimited number of people.

But the way human beings learn requires personal guidance, fine-tuning, and hand-holding, often at an individual level, especially if the learning is complex and needs to be applied in practical ways.

From a business-model point of view, the online learning space makes it possible to earn a lot of money, as many have done and are doing, by creating a product that can be sold to many people at one time and that requires little to no maintenance, supervision, or upkeep once it's been set up.

From a learning-model point of view, however, learning something new in a way that works for YOU as a learner, may require in-depth focus, attention, wisdom, guidance, understanding, and personal interaction.

 This is more true for some learners than others, and more true at some points along the learning journey than others.

I'm working my way towards developing a  new, integrated business + learning model focusing on the touch-points that require  in-depth and customized focus from the instructor.

My goal is to help all of us optimize both the impact and the reach of our online courses.

I'm working towards creating a high-level understanding of how each of us can structure the entire "universe" of our course offerings (our "whole cow") in ways that optimize the "set it and forget it" aspects for things that DON'T require in-depth guidance from the instructor, and also optimize the "high learning impact" aspects for parts of the learning curve that DO.


Come to the Learn and Get Smarter community meeting (we're BACK after taking last week off due to a conference) and let's talk about what's on YOUR mind with respect to creating online courses that YOUR course participants will learn from, and love!

Come to the community meeting

Saturday, August 22nd, 2020

9 AM Pacific/ 12 Noon Eastern

many people online in a conference call